Digital Water(IT / IOT)

IT/IOT/Instrumentation in WWM

Automation has become a necessary element in the Water and Waste Management industry. The important benefits of the Automation are:

  • 1) Improved Processes
  • 2) Best use of Resources
  • 3) Reduction of Energy consumption and costs
  • 4) Better use of Labor and other resources
  • 5) Reduce the waste and increase the operating efficiencies
  • 6) Access to data from the process which can used for decision making

For organizations and systems that operate in the water industry, there has been the dependency on Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems to monitor some parts of the water distributions systems, yet the practical limitation of its installation points has restricted its use.

The number of connected devices will grow by two billion objects in 2006 to a projected 200 billion by 2020. With the growing number of connected devices, the water industry is taking advantage of IoT sensors to monitor water levels, chemical leaks, and even regulate water flows.

IoT in water treatment uses the concept of smart sensors installed at various points in the water system. These sensors collect data and send it back to the monitoring systems. This data could include, water quality, temperature changes, pressure changes, water leak detection, and chemical leakage detection.

An IoT enabled smart water sensor can track quality, pressure, and temperature of water. In fact, a sensor solution can measure liquid flow and can be used by a water utility company to track the flow across the whole treatment plant. Engineers can then access this data, interpret the data, and make suggestions and send to the facility manager.

IoT can also play a role in leak detection and send an immediate alert to a remote dashboard. These notifications are immediate where as if an engineer had to check the levels by hand or on foot it could take hours for a problem to be detected. Now, it allows the engineer to address the issue faster, find a solution, and move on to the next task.

Another huge benefit to IoT in wastewater management is the detection of residual chemicals after treatment. This can be used to calculate the efficacy of the selected treatment process and ensure the release of chemicals stays within permissible limits.

In this Track IT/IOT/Instrumentation, the speakers will share their knowledge of various aspects of IT/IOT/Instrumentation applications in water and Waste Management applications.

Speakers

Research Scientist at IBM Research Read More

Professor at the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering
University of Chicago Read More

Dr Sukanya Randhawa is AI researcher at IBM and creator of IBM's 'Bluewater Eye'. Her focus lies in developing innovative technology solutions that integrate several emerging technologies such as  AI, Geo-spatial analytics with focus for applications in water quality and precision agriculture space. In the water space, her work is geared towards developing scalable geospatial technology (“IBM Bluewater EYE”) with advanced AI tools for using satellites as low cost water sensors for monitoring water pollution and deriving insights for studying environmental impact for rivers/lakes.

Dr Sukanya Randhawa is AI researcher at IBM and creator of IBM's 'Bluewater Eye'. Her focus lies in developing innovative technology solutions that integrate several emerging technologies such as  AI, Geo-spatial analytics with focus for applications in water quality and precision agriculture space. In the water space, her work is geared towards developing scalable geospatial technology (“IBM Bluewater EYE”) with advanced AI tools for using satellites as low cost water sensors for monitoring water pollution and deriving insights for studying environmental impact for rivers/lakes.

Dr Sukanya Randhawa is AI researcher at IBM and creator of IBM's 'Bluewater Eye'. Her focus lies in developing innovative technology solutions that integrate several emerging technologies such as  AI, Geo-spatial analytics with focus for applications in water quality and precision agriculture space. In the water space, her work is geared towards developing scalable geospatial technology (“IBM Bluewater EYE”) with advanced AI tools for using satellites as low cost water sensors for monitoring water pollution and deriving insights for studying environmental impact for rivers/lakes.

Supratik Guha is Professor at the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago, and a Senior Scientist at Argonne National Laboratory. Prior to joining the University of Chicago and Argonne, he was at IBM Research where, between 2010 - 2015, he was Director of Physical Sciences. His research interests are in the areas of materials, devices and systems for information processing systems of the future. In particular, recently, he has been interested in large area sensing networks for geospatial applications such as water and soil management. He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the Materials Research Society and the American Physical Society.

Supratik Guha is Professor at the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago, and a Senior Scientist at Argonne National Laboratory. Prior to joining the University of Chicago and Argonne, he was at IBM Research where, between 2010 - 2015, he was Director of Physical Sciences. His research interests are in the areas of materials, devices and systems for information processing systems of the future. In particular, recently, he has been interested in large area sensing networks for geospatial applications such as water and soil management. He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the Materials Research Society and the American Physical Society.

Supratik Guha is Professor at the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago, and a Senior Scientist at Argonne National Laboratory. Prior to joining the University of Chicago and Argonne, he was at IBM Research where, between 2010 - 2015, he was Director of Physical Sciences. His research interests are in the areas of materials, devices and systems for information processing systems of the future. In particular, recently, he has been interested in large area sensing networks for geospatial applications such as water and soil management. He is a member of the US National Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the Materials Research Society and the American Physical Society.